Pediatric Tinea Versicolor Medication

Updated: Jan 27, 2020
  • Author: Lyubomir A Dourmishev, MD, PhD; Chief Editor: Dirk M Elston, MD  more...
  • Print
Medication

Medication Summary

Tinea versicolor responds well to both topical and oral antimycotic therapies. Some patients prefer oral therapy because of convenience, while others prefer the safety of topical therapies. Many effective topical therapies are available without prescription and can be used for suppressive therapy or for treating recurrences without the need for a follow-up visit. Traditional topical herbal therapies are still used in many parts of the world. [15]

Topical therapy alone is indicated for most patients. Systemic treatment may be indicated for patients with extensive involvement, those with recurrent infections, or those in whom topical therapy has failed.

Systemic azoles are highly effective against M furfur and are usually combined with topical antimycotics in severe cases, and new agents are being investigated. [16]  While oral fluconazole has been used in tinea versicolor, the results may be no better than with topical agents. [17, 18]

Next:

Antifungal Agent, Topical

Class Summary

Selenium sulfide is effective against M furfur; it also has cytostatic effects on the epidermis and follicular epithelium, thus reducing corneocyte production. Azole, allylamine and other antifungal creams are also highly effective mycocides against M furfur.

Selenium sulfide topical (Selsun Blue, Exsel, Head & Shoulders)

Selenium sulfide is available as a shampoo or lotion in 1% or 2.5% concentrations. It is a safe and effective therapy that has been used for years. The principle advantages of selenium sulfide are its low cost, over-the-counter availability, and convenient application. However, it is an irritant, and some patients report itching or eczema after overnight applications. It may also stain clothes and bedding. Lotion is preferred in children and patients with sensitive skin.

Clotrimazole topical (Lotrimin-AF, Canesten)

Clotrimazole is an imidazole broad-spectrum antifungal agent. It inhibits the synthesis of ergosterol, causing cellular components to leak, resulting in fungal cell death.

Econazole topical (Ecoza)

Econazole is an antifungal agent that is a water-miscible base consisting of pegoxol 7 stearate, peglicol 5 oleate, mineral oil, benzoic acid, butylated hydroxyanisole, and purified water. The color of the soft cream is white to off-white and is for topical use only. It interferes with RNA and protein synthesis and metabolism. It disrupts fungal cell wall permeability, causing fungal cell death. Econazole exhibits broad-spectrum antifungal activity against many gram-negative organisms. It is effective in cutaneous infections.

Ketoconazole topical (Nizoral)

Ketoconazole is an imidazole broad-spectrum antifungal agent. It inhibits the synthesis of ergosterol, causing cellular components to leak, resulting in fungal cell death.

Oxiconazole (Oxistat)

Oxiconazole damages the fungal cell wall membrane by inhibiting the biosynthesis of ergosterol. Membrane permeability is increased, causing nutrients to leak out and resulting in fungal cell death.

Sertaconazole (Ertaczo)

Sertaconazole is an imidazole broad-spectrum antifungal agent. It inhibits the synthesis of ergosterol, causing cellular components to leak, resulting in fungal cell death.

Ciclopirox (Batrafen, Loprox)

Ciclopirox interferes with the synthesis of DNA, RNA, and protein by inhibiting the transport of essential elements in fungal cells.

Naftifine (Exoderil, Naftin)

Naftifine is a broad-spectrum antifungal agent and synthetic allylamine derivative; it may decrease the synthesis of ergosterol, which, in turn, inhibits fungal cell growth.

Terbinafine topical (Lamisil)

Terbinafine inhibits squalene epoxidase, which decreases ergosterol synthesis, causing fungal cell death. Use the medication until symptoms significantly improve. The duration of treatment should be greater than 1 week, but not greater than 4 weeks.

Butenafine (Mentax)

Butenafine inhibits squalene epoxidation, which, in turn, causes blockage of ergosterol biosynthesis (an essential component of fungal cell membranes). It is used topically for tinea (pityriasis) versicolor due to M furfur, tinea pedis (ie, athlete's foot), tinea corporis (ie, ringworm), and tinea cruris (ie, jock itch) due to Epidermophyton floccosum, Trichophyton mentagrophytes, Trichophyton rubrum, and Trichophyton tonsurans.

Previous
Next:

Antifungal Agent, Systemic

Class Summary

Systemic azoles are highly effective against M furfur and are usually combined with topical antimycotics in severe cases, and new agents are being investigated.

Ketoconazole oral (Nizoral)

Ketoconazole is an imidazole broad-spectrum antifungal agent; it inhibits the synthesis of ergosterol, causing cellular components to leak, resulting in fungal cell death.  While available as both a topical and systemic agent, systemic use of the drug carries a black box warning and is inappropriate for conditions that are not severe or life-threatening. M furfur is eradicated by the presence of ketoconazole in outer skin layers.

Fluconazole (Diflucan)

Fluconazole is a synthetic oral antifungal (broad-spectrum bistriazole) that selectively inhibits fungal cytochrome P-450 and sterol C-14 alpha-demethylation, which prevents conversion of lanosterol to ergosterol, thereby disrupting cellular membranes. It has little affinity for mammalian cytochromes, which is believed to explain its low toxicity. Fluconazole is available as tablets for oral administration, as a powder for oral suspension, and as a sterile solution for intravenous use. It has fewer adverse effects and better tissue distribution than older systemic imidazoles. It is most commonly used in the treatment of candidiasis. While it has been used in tinea versicolor, the results may be no better than with topical agents.

Itraconazole (Sporanox, Orungal)

Itraconazole is a synthetic triazole antifungal agent that inhibits fungal cell growth by inhibiting the cytochrome P-450–dependent synthesis of ergosterol, a vital component of fungal cell membranes.

Previous