Sternoclavicular Joint Injury in Emergency Medicine Medication

Updated: Dec 20, 2019
  • Author: John P Rudzinski, MD; Chief Editor: Trevor John Mills, MD, MPH  more...
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Medication

Medication Summary

The goal of therapy is to reduce inflammation and to minimize severe pain. To achieve this goal, anti-inflammatory agents and analgesics are the drugs of choice (DOCs).

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Analgesics

Class Summary

These agents commonly are used for the relief of mild to moderate pain. Pain control is essential to quality patient care. Analgesics ensure patient comfort, promote pulmonary toilet, and enable physical therapy regimens. Most analgesics have sedating properties that are beneficial for patients with injuries. Although the effects of NSAIDs in the treatment of pain tend to be patient specific, ibuprofen is usually the DOC for the initial therapy. Other NSAIDs may be considered.

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Ibuprofen (Motrin, Advil, NeoProfen, Provil, Dyspel)

In the absence of contraindications, this is usually the DOC for treating mild to moderate pain. Inhibits inflammatory reactions and pain by decreasing prostaglandin synthesis.

Naproxen (Aleve, Anaprox DS, Naprelan, Naprosyn)

For relief of mild to moderate pain. Inhibits inflammatory reactions and pain by decreasing the activity of the enzyme cyclooxygenase, which results in a decrease of prostaglandin synthesis.

Ketoprofen

For relief of mild to moderate pain and inflammation. Administer small dosages initially to patients with a small body size, elderly persons, and those with renal or liver disease. When administering this medication, doses >75 mg do not increase therapeutic effects. Administer high doses with caution, and closely observe patients for response.

Acetaminophen (Tylenol, Aspirin Free Anacin, Feverall, Mapap, Cetafen)

DOC for pain in patients with documented hypersensitivity to aspirin or NSAIDs, in those with upper GI disease, or in those who are taking oral anticoagulants.

Acetaminophen with codeine (Tylenol with codeine, Capital/codeine)

The combination of acetaminophen and codeine is indicated for the treatment of mild to moderate pain.

Hydrocodone and acetaminophen (Lorcet Plus, Vicodin, Norco, Verdrocet, Zamicet)

This agent is indicated for the relief of moderately severe to severe pain.

Oxycodone and acetaminophen (Percocet, Endocet, Primlev, Xartemis XR)

The combination of oxycodone and acetaminophen is used for the relief of moderate to severe pain. It is the DOC for aspirin-hypersensitive patients.

Oxycodone/aspirin

This drug combination of oxycodone and aspirin is indicated for the relief of moderately severe to severe pain.

Indomethacin (Indocin,Tivorbex)

Indomethacin is thought to be the most effective NSAID for the treatment of AS, although no scientific evidence supports this claim. It is used for relief of mild to moderate pain; it inhibits inflammatory reactions and pain by decreasing the activity of COX, which results in a decrease of prostaglandin synthesis.

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