Iron Toxicity Medication

Updated: Sep 02, 2021
  • Author: Clifford S Spanierman, MD; Chief Editor: Michael A Miller, MD  more...
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Medication

Medication Summary

The goals of pharmacotherapy are to reduce iron levels, prevent complications, and reduce morbidity. Deferoxamine (Desferal) is used for chelation of iron in both acute and chronic toxicity.

The oral chelating agent deferasirox (Exjade) is approved by the US Food and Drug Administration (FDA) for the treatment of chronic iron overload due to blood transfusions in patients 2 year of age and older; it is also approved for treatment of chronic iron overload resulting from non–transfusion-dependent thalassemia.

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Chelating agents

Deferoxamine (Desferal)

DOC for iron intoxication. Freely soluble in water. Approximately 8 mg of iron is bound by 100 mg of deferoxamine. Excreted in urine and bile and gives urine a red discoloration. Readily chelates iron from ferritin and hemosiderin but not transferrin. Most effective when administered continuously by infusion. May be administered by IM injection or slow IV infusion. Does not effectively chelate other trace metals of nutritional importance. Provided in vials containing 500 mg of lyophilized sterile drug. Add 2 mL of sterile water to each vial for injection, bringing the concentration to 250 mg/mL. For IV use, may be diluted in 0.9% sterile saline, 5% dextrose solution, or Ringer solution. IV administration route is prefered, with the usual dose 15 mg/kg/hour. Histamine may be released, resulting in hypotension that is treatable by fluid resuscitation. The duration of therapy usually is 24 hours, and should be guided by a medical toxicologist.

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GI decontaminants

Polyethylene glycol bowel prep (GoLYTELY, Colyte)

Laxative with strong electrolytic and osmotic effects that has cathartic actions in the GI tract.

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