Lymphogranuloma Venereum (LGV) in Emergency Medicine Follow-up

Updated: Apr 02, 2021
  • Author: Kristyn J Smith, DO; Chief Editor: Jeter (Jay) Pritchard Taylor, III, MD  more...
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Follow-up

Deterrence/Prevention

Infection confers little or no protective immunity against future infection.

Sexual contacts should be referred for evaluation, testing, and empiric treatment with an anti-chlamydia regimen (doxycycline 100mg orally twice a day for 7 days) possible treatment. If tests return positive the duration of doxycycline should be extended to the full 21 day regimen. 

Encourage the practice of safe sex.

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Complications

Secondary lymphogranuloma venereum (LGV): Bubonuli may rupture to form sinuses or fistulas. This may result in long-term complications, including fibrosis and deforming scars at the penile base. In women, cervicitis, perimetritis, or salpingitis may occur.

Tertiary LGV: Complete bowel obstruction from an anal stricture may occur. Bowel perforation from chronic rectal inflammation and scarring may develop. 

Other complications of LGV: arthritis, conjunctivitis, hepatomegaly and, rarely, pericarditis, pneumonia, and meningoencephalitis.

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Prognosis

Generally, full recovery is expected with appropriate treatment, especially when treated during the primary or secondary stages. 

Reinfection and relapse may occur.

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Patient Education

For excellent patient education resources, visit eMedicineHealth's patient education articles on Sexually Transmitted Diseases, How to Use a CondomBirth Control, and Chlamydia.

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