Sarcosporidiosis Follow-up

Updated: Apr 16, 2018
  • Author: Edward Charbek, MD, FCCP; Chief Editor: John L Brusch, MD, FACP  more...
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Follow-up

Further Outpatient Care

Patients with the enteric form of sarcosporidiosis may be tested to document clearance of the sarcocyst from their stool. Note that shedding can continue for up to 6 months.

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Further Inpatient Care

Inpatient care is not typically indicated in the absence of a serious co-morbidity such as myocarditis or severe diarrhea with accompanying dehydration.

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Inpatient & Outpatient Medications

Oral corticosteroids are indicated in the outpatient setting for symptomatic inflammatory muscular involvement.

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Deterrence/Prevention

Instruct patients not to eat raw beef or pork if the risk of sarcosporidiosis is present in the community.

Practice good food hygiene to prevent fecal-oral transmission of this parasite.

Ensure that meat is properly cooked or frozen (see Diet).

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Complications

Serious complications may include dehydration, eosinophilic enteritis, and ulcerative obstructive entercolitis. [26]

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Prognosis

Sarcosporidiosis is a self-limited disease that carries an excellent prognosis. Rarely, eosinophilic myositis symptoms can persist for many years, recurring when further cyst wall deterioration occurs.

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Patient Education

Sarcosporidiosis is a significant food-borne zoonotic infection and is a risk in travelers to and from Southeast Asia. Persons who shed infected oocysts in their stool can spread the infection to others through the fecal-oral route if sanitation is poor. Instruct patients not to eat raw beef or pork and to practice good food hygiene. It should also be emphasized that Sarcocystis infection has been found in other common species such as sheep, horses, and camels. [22] Patients should understand that sarcosporidiosis does not necessitate routine treatment and is usually an incidental finding discovered on muscle biopsy.

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